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YVR, Vancouver, B.C. Airport

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YVR, Vancouver, B.C. International Airport. The interior design of the International Terminal was inspired by British Columbia's great outdoors and the art of the Northwest Coast that depicts British Columbia's native wildlife, mountains, rivers, forests, and aboriginal heritage. In true Coast Salish tradition, two red cedar Welcome Figures stand tall at the entrance to the Arrivals Hall of the International Terminal. Carved by Susan A. Point of the Musqueam people, the figures stand at a height of approximately six meters (17 feet), and portray an inspiring welcome for all arriving passengers..Carved from the same log, one figure represents a male form and the other a female. Their carving style reflects the art of early coast Salish culture..Figures such as these were originally carved as house posts; however, the Welcome Figures in the International Terminal will remain as free-standing sculptures to silently, yet auspiciously, welcome passengers to Vancouver.
Copyright
© 2009 Susan Seubert
Image Size
4368x2912 / 10.4MB
YVR, Vancouver, B.C. International Airport.  The interior design of the International Terminal was inspired by British Columbia's great outdoors and the art of the Northwest Coast that depicts British Columbia's native wildlife, mountains, rivers, forests, and aboriginal heritage.  In true Coast Salish tradition, two red cedar Welcome Figures stand tall at the entrance to the Arrivals Hall of the International Terminal. Carved by Susan A. Point of the Musqueam people, the figures stand at a height of approximately six meters (17 feet), and portray an inspiring welcome for all arriving passengers..Carved from the same log, one figure represents a male form and the other a female. Their carving style reflects the art of early coast Salish culture..Figures such as these were originally carved as house posts; however, the Welcome Figures in the International Terminal will remain as free-standing sculptures to silently, yet auspiciously, welcome passengers to Vancouver.